Addragoole Burren


Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Even though the shore is almost devoid of vegetation, the elevated areas above sea level with prominent grikes may be colonized by plants. Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Even though the shore is almost devoid of vegetation, the elevated areas above sea level with prominent grikes may be colonized by plants. Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Even though the shore is almost devoid of vegetation, the elevated areas above sea level with prominent grikes may be colonized by plants. Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Even though the shore is almost devoid of vegetation, the elevated areas above sea level with prominent grikes may be colonized by plants. Karst pavements and the associated topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. Note crinoid ossicles exposed by Pleistocene dissolution of the surface lime matrex (Williams, 1966). Addrogoole Harbour and the Ferry for the Arran Islands Foreground of karst pavements and topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. In distance are cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Foreground of karst pavements and topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. In distance are cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Foreground of karst pavements and topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. In distance are cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Foreground of karst pavements and topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. In distance are cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Foreground of karst pavements and topography of shallow water Carboniferous Limestones. In distance are cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Shore line and cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Shore line and cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Shore line and cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Shore line and cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Shore line and cliffs of Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation. Fisherstreet slumps in Gull Island formation interpreted to have formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin. Fisherstreet slumps in Gull Island formation interpreted to have formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin. Fisherstreet slumps in Gull Island formation interpreted to have formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin. Fisherstreet slumps in Gull Island formation interpreted to have formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin. Fisherstreet slumps in Gull Island formation interpreted to have formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin. Fisherstreet slumps in Gull Island formation interpreted to have formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin. Fisherstreet slumps in Gull Island formation interpreted to have formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin. Fisherstreet slump sub volcano after McNamara & Hennessy (2010). This feature is amid the slumps in Gull Island formation where they formed by dewatering of the slumped beds, following their transportation to their resting place south of an unstable deltaic shelf margin.

Gallery of Carboniferous at Doolin and Fisher Street, Co Clare

Photographs taken in June 2008 on the SEPM Field trip to Co Clare, Ireland, by Christopher Kendall of Carboniferous outcrops at Addragoole west of Doolin and close to Fisher Street. These included the Dinantian Burren Limestone Formation and the overlying Namurian Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation.

The images of the Dinantian Burren Limestone Formation include karst pavements and the associated topography. Exposures can be seen to be composed of shallow water carbonate. Note the clints (limestone blocks) and grikes (joints and fractures formed by Variscan folding (Coller, 1984)) extensively enlarged by Pleistocene dissolution (Williams, 1966). Even though the shore is almost devoid of vegetation, some still is colonizing the elevated areas above sea level with prominent grikes.

The images of the overlying Namurian Clare Shale and Gull Island Formation were taken in the steep cliffs to the south east of Fisher Street. Here the work of Gill (1979), Collinson et al. (1991), Martinsen & Collinson (2002), Martinsen et al. (2003), and Strachann and Alsop (2006) suggest the the base of the Fisherstreet Slump within the Gull Island Formation on the basis of the Goniatites in the marine band R. dubium (R1a5). Strachann and Alsop, (2006) report that the Gull Island Formation is 140 m thick in the Burren region though it reaches 550 m in the vicinity to the Shannon Estuary.

The outcrops in the image gallery are fine-grained sandstones and siltstones and where they occur towards the base of the formation are characterized the slumped structures of the Fisherstreet Slide. Strachann and Alsop, (2006) indicate that the slide is overlain by a rippled sandstone bed that contains flute marks, tool marks, and sand volcanoes that they interpret formed during late-stage dewatering of the slumped beds. As in the outcrops to the south the formation represents tubiditic deposition on an unstable shelf margin, possibly a pro-deltaic slope, that prograded eastwards into the Shannon Trough (Collinson et al, 1991).


Bibliography and References

Coller, D.W. (1984), Variscan structures in the UpperPalaeozoic rocks of west central Ireland: Geological Society of London, Special Publications 14, p. 185-194.

Collinson, J.D., Martinsen, O., Bakken, B. & Kloster, A.(1991), Early ¢ll of the Western Irish Namurian Basin: a complex relationship between turbidites and deltas. basin Res., 3, 223-242.
Drew, D. (2001) Classic Landforms of the Burren Karst, Geographical Association in conjunction with the British Geomorphological Research Group. p. 52.
 
Gallagher, Stephen J. & Somerville, Ian D., (2003), Lower Carboniferous (Late Viséan) Platform Development and cyclicity In Southern Ireland: Foraminiferal biofacies and lithofacies evidence, Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia;  Volume 109 No. 2 Pp. 159-171.

Gill, D.W. (1979), Syndepositional sliding and slumping in the West Clare Namurian Basin, Ireland. Geol. Surv. Ireland, Spec. Pap., 4, 1-30.

Hodson, F. (1952), The beds above the Carboniferous limestone in North-West County Clare, Eire: Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society 109, p. 259-283
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Leeder, M.R. (1988), Recent developments in Carboniferous geology: a critical review with implications for the British Isles and N.W. Europe: Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association 99, p. 73-100.

Martinsen, O.J., Lien, T., Walker, R.G. & Collinson, J.D.(2003), Facies and sequential organisation of a mudstone dominated slope and basin foor succession: the Gull Island Formation, Shannon Basin,Western Ireland. Mar. Petrol. Geol., 20, 789-807.

McNamara, M. A and Hennessy, R. W., (2010), The Geology of the Burren region, Co. Clare, Ireland Burren Connect Project.175pp.

Rider, M.H. (1974) The Namurian of West County Clare. Proc. Roy. Irish Acad., 74B, 125-142. Strachann, L. J., and Alsop, G. I. (2006) Slump folds as estimators of palaeoslope: a case study from the Fisherstreet Slump of County Clare, Ireland, Basin Research 18, 451–470.

Williams, W. (1966), Limestone pavements with special reference to Western Ireland. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 40, p. 155
Tuesday, September 17, 2013
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